Mainly random reblogs, sometimes my own work.
Portfolio online at www.haryosukmawanto.com

alexandrabertels:

Gold fever

Holy shit you’re still alive.

alexandrabertels:

Gold fever

Holy shit you’re still alive.

aqqindex:

Christopher Rodriguez

aqqindex:

Christopher Rodriguez

(via jesuisperdu)

Top: Coronation of George VI. London 12 May, 1937, by Henri Cartier-Bresson

Bottom: Margaret Thatcher’s funeral. London. 17 April, 2013, by Haryo Sukmawanto

—-

I’m not comparing myself to Cartier-Bresson here, but I saw the top picture at Cartier-Bresson’s retrospective at the Centre Pompidou yesterday and it reminded me of the picture I took last year. It’s pretty funny how people deliberately turned their backs on the king, not as a form of protest but just to be able to see the event through a mirror on a stick. 76 years later, people just stick their cameras up in the air while standing on bike racks.

she had seen behind the shutters
normally drawn across the human face
and suddenly realized
there wasn’t much if any
affection for her in my face
and that knowledge
was worse than her injuries.

Al Purdy, On Being Human

From work in progress

From work in progress

Kurt Vonnegut's Advice: Do Art

anickelsworth:

image

A Xavier High School English teacher in New York City had a great idea.  Wanting her students to test their persuasive writing skills, she asked each of them to write their favorite author and ask him or her to visit the school.  A handful wrote to Kurt Vonnegut and, while he didn’t make an appearance, his thoughtful reply was the only response any received.

November 5, 2006

Dear Xavier High School, and Ms. Lockwood, and Messrs Perin, McFeely, Batten, Maurer and Congiusta:

I thank you for your friendly letters. You sure know how to cheer up a really old geezer (84) in his sunset years. I don’t make public appearances any more because I now resemble nothing so much as an iguana.

What I had to say to you, moreover, would not take long, to wit: Practice any art, music, singing, dancing, acting, drawing, painting, sculpting, poetry, fiction, essays, reportage, no matter how well or badly, not to get money and fame, but to experience becoming, to find out what’s inside you, to make your soul grow.

Seriously! I mean starting right now, do art and do it for the rest of your lives. Draw a funny or nice picture of Ms. Lockwood, and give it to her. Dance home after school, and sing in the shower and on and on. Make a face in your mashed potatoes. Pretend you’re Count Dracula.

Here’s an assignment for tonight, and I hope Ms. Lockwood will flunk you if you don’t do it: Write a six line poem, about anything, but rhymed. No fair tennis without a net. Make it as good as you possibly can. But don’t tell anybody what you’re doing. Don’t show it or recite it to anybody, not even your girlfriend or parents or whatever, or Ms. Lockwood. OK?

Tear it up into teeny-weeny pieces, and discard them into widely separated trash recepticals. You will find that you have already been gloriously rewarded for your poem. You have experienced becoming, learned a lot more about what’s inside you, and you have made your soul grow.

God bless you all!

Kurt Vonnegut

"Corbijn is regarded with envy and awe by many of his peers, but he does not call himself a professional—“there is so much I don’t know”—and he believes in the power of limitation to increase your creativity. This is why he sticks to film: it does not have the vast flexibility of digital, a flexibility that detracts from the power of the moment when the shutter fires. He is passionate about the material process of making a photograph from film. “When I started, I felt that I didn’t want a normal job in photography, I wanted that sense of adventure when you meet someone and take a picture. I felt that digital is more like a job. You look at the screen to see if you have it right, then you take another picture. When I come back from a trip, I don’t know what I have exactly. I have to get it developed, so I won’t know for a couple of days. I like the tension of not knowing exactly what you have.”"

THE TRI-X FACTOR | More Intelligent Life (via photographsonthebrain)

Another good quote, which Wolf’s and Rafman’s photography better than I ever tried

"Google Street View famously, notoriously, set out to photograph all the streets in the world using car-borne digital cameras. Two artists, Michael Wolf and Jon Rafman, decided to use selected images from the millions thus produced to create eerie works of art. These were technically poor photographs, but evocative nonetheless. It was, in its way, an attempt to resurrect the art of street photography”

(via photographsonthebrain)

(Source: fotokniga)